Autor Thema: Tegenaria silvestris? => Tegenaria sp.  (Gelesen 147 mal)

Raffaele Falato

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Tegenaria silvestris? => Tegenaria sp.
« am: 2020-03-06 10:58:23 »
Gorgoglione, Province of Matera, Basilicata, southern Italy.

Discovery date: March 5, 11:30 am.
Habitat: 700 m - in an oak forest, under a stone that is part of a low wall, all around there are other stones, low vegetation, some bark and dead leaves, further on there is a large abandoned building.
Dimensions: see photo.

Good morning.
Is this pregnant (or satiated) female a specimen of Tegenaria silvestris?
Thank you.
Raf

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« Letzte Änderung: 2020-03-22 22:21:42 von Tobias Bauer »

Simeon Indzhov

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Re: Tegenaria silvestris?
« Antwort #1 am: 2020-03-06 11:11:01 »
Not impossible, but there is also Tegenaria parvula in Italy, and also a handful of other species. So best leave it at genus
Simeon

Raffaele Falato

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Re: Tegenaria silvestris?
« Antwort #2 am: 2020-03-06 11:42:03 »
Well, the less known and less frequent Italic species to be encountered do not have curled legs like my spider and they are almost all smaller (including T. parvula) or they live in different areas and very far from Basilicata.
Anyway, after having a look at the Czech site (the problem is always the same, I don't know if I can quote or link it on this forum), the only species that really gets very close to my spider, even more than T. silvestris, is Tegenaria pagana (see legs, less massive).
What do you think?

Tobias Bauer

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Re: Tegenaria silvestris?
« Antwort #3 am: 2020-03-22 22:21:16 »
Tegenaria sp., as Simeon said. I believe that there are plenty of surprises in your area, and I think we can't rule out undescribed species, unfortunately. Maybe also collect some and send them to specialists. Mediterranean agelenids also tend to have relatively small distribution areas, like T. annae.

Raffaele Falato

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Re: Tegenaria silvestris? => Tegenaria sp.
« Antwort #4 am: 2020-03-22 22:38:51 »
Thank you guys.
I realize that the world of spiders, and their identification, is much more complex than that of snakes and birds.
Although reluctantly, I believe that I will follow your advice, dear Simeon and Tobias, and I will collect the most "freak" specimens and then deliver them to expert people for identification.
Greetings from Italy.
Raf

Simeon Indzhov

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Re: Tegenaria silvestris? => Tegenaria sp.
« Antwort #5 am: 2020-03-22 22:44:12 »
Yep, spiders are much more diverse than vertebrates, and unlike in many larger insects, the genital traits take priority over the somatic ones (I think that in some groups, the somatic differences might have been underdescribed, but even then, the microscopic genitalia ID remains the safest option, and somatic traits can be variable). Also, make sure the specimens you catch are adult - or send them alive!